Rich Links: Sudan fuel price protests and Congo’s oil law

The most important developments and most interesting reads around resource politics in Africa from around the internet:

End of fuel subsidy sparks violent protests in Sudan

In an attempt to limit government spending, the Sudanese fuel subsidy was cut in a surprise move, sending fuel prices at the pump sky-high. Prices almost doubled overnight, from $2.83 to $4.71. Protests erupted in the capital Khartoum and around the country, leading to at least 29 deaths. The demonstrations were said to be the largest of President Al Bashir’s 24 year rule. Schools were closed and the internet connection to parts of the country is cut off. Al Jazeera

Why hasn’t Botswana diversified out of Diamonds

Interesting Analysis on the question, why Botswana despite its sound political institutions and solid economic growth has so far not managed to move away from an extraction-based economy. Why Nations Fail

Congo’s oil law

The DRC’s proposed oil law would open the door to exploration in national parks (especially Virunga) and doesn’t provide any means to ensure transparency in the allocation of contracts and revenues. Think Africa Press

Ghana’s gold production likely to drop by 18%

Due to falling world market prices, gold producers are cutting their production in Africa’s second largest exporting country. This could have severe consequences for government revenues, with oil production already well below targets. The government has won elections mainly on the promise of investing heavily in power production and other infrastructure and planned on using funds from resource extraction to deliver on these promises. Mining Review